Emotive

I dubbed these galleries of abstract art "Emotive" because while abstract, they are still representational. There are few to no pieces which were produced apart from meaning or intention but purely out of technique and material. My work is always directed by some experience or an expression of something- perhaps not entirely specific- but certainly asking a question. In some ways my life like work is more abstract, because it is less inclined to contain any particular meaning.

The above collection is a miscellaneous non sequitur assortment of my Emotive work- spanning the past ten years- the earliest from my senior year in art school- and the latest produced in June 2015.

In the collections below, the reasoning behind my decision to dub my work "Emotive" becomes, I believe, a bit more clear. My largest project to date, "365," is composed almost entirely of non-realistic but still representational pieces, which express my daily spiritual experience and status over the course of year. Below that is the very, very small collection (composed of only two pieces) which are part narrative, part portrait, and despite containing realistic imagery, wholly emotional in their intention.

 

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365

365

As the title suggests, this collection was created over the course of a year (and a little beyond) and is composed of 365 devotional pieces produced one each day with the intention of exploring more deeply, my personal relationship to the Presence I understand as God. Being Christian there are many obvious biblical and messianic references in the poetic verbal "Accompaniment" which I felt compelled to write along with each piece in order to more clearly record my state of mind and soul at the time of individual rendering, as well as provide much needed context for what is otherwise dominantly abstract imagery.

(Represented here is only a select assortment of the entire body of work.)

 


Memorials

Memorials

This, very small, but important collection represents my response to the intimate and isolating tragedy of experiencing a miscarriage. While I myself have never been pregnant or been a parent, a good friend of mine who was both, suddenly lost her unborn child. In this day and age where planned parenthood is common place and unborn children are scientifically (and lets be honest- callously) referred to as fetuses, their impending and apparent humanity denied, I was struck by the difficulty that must come with the grief of losing a child before it ever had a chance to truly be recognized as one. What does one do in such a situation? Do you have a funeral? Do you give them a name? Is there ever any public record beyond a footnote in a woman's medical history tantamount to recording that she once came in with a cold on such and such a day in such and such a year? Do you put the loss out of your mind and move on and try again?

My answer to this deeply personal pain of my friend, was to create the above commemorative piece. Imitating the religious "triptych" design often seen in catholic churches, this piece is composed of three parts. The first part, or window, represents the loss- the empty hands in the posture often held by expectant mothers regarding their pregnant stomachs- but in this case, encircling a darkening void. The second and central part, is intended to depict and celebrate, what is - that is - the lives still present and blessing us. In this case the two otters represent my friends two surviving and healthy daughters (interestingly, I made them into otters and only afterwards discovered that these were my friends' favorite animal.) The third and final piece is meant to represent the continuing cycle of life, or if you are Christian, then the constancy of God's presence and the eternal life of the both born and unborn souls.

The second piece in this collection follows the same narrative but was commissioned by another friend for some one I did not know personally.

The dolphins represent the woman's husband and already living child.


Light Painting

Light Painting

Take sparklers, plus twilight, plus time lapse photography and you get- lots of fun 4th of July art! Perhaps my most truly abstract work, this collection is simply what it looks like- drawing the the evening air with light, and capturing the vanishing designs that the naked eye is normally unable to appreciate.